Contact

Schedule a Keynote
To book Marni Jameson for your next event, please call 415.382.0505 or visit http://www.gentryagency.com.

Media Inquiries
Contact Kate Burke 617-252-5216, kate.burke@perseusbooks.com

Add to Your Publication
To add Marni’s syndicated column to your publication, please e-mail Marni at marni@marnijameson.com

Purchase Reprints & Story Rights
To order article reprints or for permission to purchase reprint rights for one of Marni’s stories or columns, please e-mail marni@marnijameson.com

If you’re a reader and want to contact Marni, please email her at marni@marnijameson.com

20 thoughts on “Contact

  1. Thank you, Marnie, for the interesting article “How to lighten your clutter load,” that appeared in the Sunday, Home + Garden portion of the (California newspaper) San Jose Mercury News’ Your Life section on September 25, 2016.

    I am dismayed with the Mercury, yet again, as they did NOT publish as promised part two of your most excellent article. Can you tell me whether the Mercury has plans to actually publish it at a future date?

    As a result of the article, I’ve been to your web site, and see that you have books available. I’ve also glanced at other articles by you that appear on the world-wide web. Thank you again for your excellent and continuing contributions.

    Yours,

    David Bethel
    bethelgomez@yahoo.com

  2. San Jose Mercury News published half your article on “How to Lighten Your Clutter Load.”

    Thank you, Marnie, for the interesting article “How to lighten your clutter load,” that appeared in the Sunday, Home + Garden portion of the (California newspaper) San Jose Mercury News’ Your Life section on September 25, 2016.

    I am dismayed with the Mercury, yet again, as they did NOT publish as promised part two of your most excellent article. Can you tell me whether the Mercury has plans to actually publish it at a future date?

    As a result of the article, I’ve been to your web site, and see that you have books available. I’ve also glanced at other articles by you that appear on the world-wide web. Thank you again for your excellent and continuing contributions.

    Yours,

    David Bethel
    bethelgomez@yahoo.com

  3. We were moving to an apartment when your columns about moving your parents appeared. After 59 years of marriage I found your advice that the item is not needed since it is in one’s memory very useful. We then had an estate sale and then sold the house. The same company moved, unpacked us and had the sale. We made enough to pay for the move. Only regret? That we didn’t wait until we were 82 and 83 years old!

  4. Home away from home? Whenever we travel we dream: especially in Italy! But my parents had homes in : Maui ( timeshare) , Lake Tahoe,and Palm Springs. You stated positives today: here’s downside. 1) Taxes 2) feel compelled to return yearly due to high costs 3) if rent there is a mess or damage ( constant worry) 4)if time share-can’t select your time and costs go up 5) maintenance costs 6) unforeseen events such as burglars ( or bears if Tahoe) 7) have to cook and clean yourself! Think I just wrote your next column! Enjoy reading you in SJ Mercury news

  5. cleaning our parents’ home … Thank you VERY MUCH for the comfort rendered by your well-chosen descriptions … just had Estate Sale of my childhood home, built by my dad …

    loved these – so True! … I’m not going to soften the blow. It’s like having open-heart surgery without anesthesia.
    “It falls into the ‘most stressful’ category,”

  6. Above information under Schedule a Keynote
    has an incorrect web address. “gentryagency.com” brings up a site in Japanese??? I believe the correct information should be “thegentryagency.com”

  7. I read your most recent article in the Denver Post with interest. Here is my story which puts a little different twist on the topic. I am a CPA and CFP, so the numbers are not a problem. In 2010 I owned two houses in Denver. I wanted to have one in Hawaii, so I sold my mountain house. I did my research and discovered the only affordable island was the Big Island. In 2010 their real estate was still in a slump. I found a nice 3 bedroom 2 bath close to the beach on the dry Kona side, very affordable ($275,000) in a nice neighborhood. However, my research was inadequate. As I discovered you do not want to be near the beach as it is hot and things rust. Now near the beach and on the beach are very different, 3x in price different. Further, don’t even consider a condo on the beach because the dues will eat you alive. Long story short, I bought a lot higher up, cooler with a better view, built a house and sold the other house at a good profit. Building is a challenge but I got lucky with a great local Hawaiian builder. The cost was not much different per square foot than Denver, except for the land of course. I am more than willing to share the rest of the story if you would like. Moral of the story, understand the climate. Take care.

  8. I enjoy your column. Don’t forget the confirmational bias of a financial planner who wants to sell stock. I have invested in houses and done well. I don’t trust the stock market.

  9. On Twitter? Would love to follow you. Loved your line “…’modifying spending.’ ‘Two more words I loathe.'” Your article supported my cause–NO second home, please. Let’s just travel & enjoy luxury hotels!

  10. Re: Buying a second home…
    Well it was a no brainer for me and my husband because we simply couldn’t afford it…so, since I couldn’t have a real beach house, I transformed our little Los Gatos bungalow into our little Santa Cruz beach house complete with wall color, kitchenware, recovered cushions…and even renovating great grandmothers dark drab hutch’toma sea foam green! Now when I wake up each morning and come home from work each day I am in my dream home…..

  11. I love your article in Denver Post today – Nov 5 2016 – about Ancient Homes hold history lessons!
    I agree with you – Why can’t schools teach history through the lens of home design, or fashion, or jewelry, or chair styles – Or something that would interest people in schools???
    I did not like history when in school but now wish I had listened more.

  12. Saw your article today on ancient homes holding history lessons for today’s homes.
    My dtr got her degree in technical theater/costume design and has said the same thing you ask, “Why can’t schools teach history through the lens of home design, or fashion, or jewelry, or chair styles?”
    She has learned more history through costume (clothing/fashion) than regular history classes.
    Thx for another interesting read.

  13. The Saturday Denver Post is my favorite issue because it contains your weekly column on all things home, family and life. Thank you for sharing your insights on downsizing, helping parents cope with aging, and your heartfelt experiences with the loss of your parents.
    Congratulations on your recent marriage to DC!

  14. I enjoyed your article about monograms in the Orlando Sentinal last week, since I love them too.
    With all the new fonts available (check out dafont.com and Creative Marked) using unique ones are fun.
    Here at Artistic Aisle Runners I hand paint top quality real fabric aisle runners for your wedding ceremony. Most couples keep the hand painted design and some display it after the wedding is over.

  15. I take a picture down from the wall, wrap it in Christmas paper, put a bow on it and rehang it.
    Looks like Christmas presents all around the house and people seem to like it a lot.
    Ever hear of this??

  16. I was so excited to see your Dec. 16 column on Marie Kondo, the tidying phenom whose best-seller has taken over airport bookstores. I have read her book and was about to begin her method, which you summarize…tidily…but what’s missing for me is your critique. I think you would agree she’s got some weird stuff in there, not the least of which is folding up all your clothes like pieces of origami and standing them on end in drawers. And those garments would be wrinkle-free and ready to wear as they are when they’re on hangers in my closet?? As a retiree living Florida, I trust your advice more than hers. Would it be possible for you do another column on “Kondo-ing” where you give it the same treatment you give houses? Tell us what Kondo advice you’d save, what you’d modify and what you’d toss. Thx!

  17. LOVE LOVE LOVE your weekly columns in the paper. It is always informative and fun reading your take on living in a home. I’d like to request an story on making a house work with dogs. I am always looking for ways to cope with the hair (upholstery ideas please) – bought a Roomba and love it- nose prints (oh please) and general tips. I am not a neophyte at this. I’ve been showing dogs, training dogs, working in commercials with dogs, grooming dogs….basically steeped in them for over 40 years. There must be new products, ideas, and help that I have overlooked. THANKS

  18. Hey Marnie: Just read your end-of-year column. What stays w/me is Dec: “Kondoing:”
    I need a lot of help, so I intend to get the book. As an ex: three yrs ago,I put about 10 suits (skirts and jackets), in my basement closet. I will NEVER wear them again, but I don’t want to give to Goodwill, more like Dress for Success. My point is about ‘giving joy.’ “Things” don’t give me joy. People and music do. So, getting rid of ‘things’ has nothing to do with: Does it “give me joy?” Happy New Year and Congrats on your marriage…

  19. Hi Marnie: Just read you column in the paper today for the first time. What an appropriate article for me to read. I have recently relocated to Florida after living in Indiana all my life and in doing so had to sell the home I loved and that I raised our family in. I do wish I had taken something small with me but I did say a prayer before I left and said a prayer when we moved into our new home. I still miss the old home but a new adventure awaits.

  20. I enjoyed the article about “parting” with a home. When we left our first home it was our 5 year old son that needed time to adjust. We made many trips by the house to check if it was “Happy!”. On the first trip I was very curious what he would find to assure him the house was happy. He saw an open window and that was enough for him to know the house was happy. On other trips by the house he saw toys, open garage, man mowing the lawn,flowers etc. No matter how many times we went by (the home was near his babysitter) he found something to assure him the house was happy.

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